Skin Cancer Awareness: SPF & Sunscreen Facts 2013: How To Prevent Melanoma And Protect Your Skin Whether You’re Caucasian, Latino Or African American

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Skin Cancer Awareness: SPF & Sunscreen Facts 2013 How To Prevent Melanoma And Protect Your Skin Whether You're Caucasian, Latino Or African American

Photo Courtesy of SheKnows.com

Summer is almost here! And that means a lot more exposed skin and fun in the sun. We all know that wearing sunscreen every day, regardless of the season, is important to prevent skin cancer, wrinkles and premature aging. BeautyStat urges its readers about the importance of continuous sun protection with our countless sun care articles and this year’s article, Top 30 Best Sunscreens to use this summer season.

Since May is National Skin Cancer Awareness Month (with May 6th being “Melanoma Monday”), let’s take the time to learn some key facts about skin cancer, and what new studies show about how women don’t know enough about the harmful effects of melanoma. Read on to learn how to protect our skin on a daily basis from the help of our friends at Neutrogena, Bona ClaraL’Oréal Paris and SkinCeuticals. We only have one skin, so let’s take care of it today!

Skin Cancer Awareness: SPF & Sunscreen Facts 2013 How To Prevent Melanoma And Protect Your Skin Whether You're Caucasian, Latino Or African American

Key facts from the Neutrogena 2013 Sun Summit:

DID YOU KNOW?

- The sun is getting brighter and there is less protection from the ozone, which means we are exposed to more dangerous UV rays now than in earlier decades

- This year, 1 in 5 Americans will develop skin cancer

- Surveys reveal more than 70% of Americans do not reapply sunscreen when they are outdoors for long periods of time

- Although it is nearly 100 million miles away, the sun is responsible for 90% of the visible signs of aging

- Cleansing is the start and end of a proper skincare regimen, and it helps sunscreen application on skin

Skin Cancer Awareness: SPF & Sunscreen Facts 2013 How To Prevent Melanoma And Protect Your Skin Whether You're Caucasian, Latino Or African American

- Sun exposure may exacerbate the inflammation of acne-prone skin

- Photostability is a key attribute to superior sun protection in cosmetics with SPF

- Skin cancer has reached epidemic levels

Sun Care Advice from Skincare Expert, Jasmina Aganovic, CEO & Founder of Bona Clara

Jasmina received her degree in Chemical and Biological engineering from MIT. Choosing an unconventional path for an engineer, she combined her science background with her passion for skincare and started a career in the beauty industry working at Living Proof and Fresh.

“Do you ever wonder what the SPF numbers mean?

An SPF of 29 simply means you can stay outside and not burn 29 times longer than if you weren’t wearing a sunscreen. Also, an SPF 30 doesn’t mean that it provides twice as much protection as an SPF 15. SPF 30 products have been shown to filter out 97% of the sun’s UVB rays, while SPF 15 products have been shown to filter out 93% of the sun’s UVB rays. Aim to apply a tablespoon to the face and neck (yes, the neck!).”

Bona Clara Hello Sunshine

BeautyStat reviewed Bona Clara’s Hello Sunshine Universal Fluid SPF 29. Read the review —> HERE!

“Make sure your skin is fully protected.

Studies have shown that up to 80% of the signs of aging are linked to the sun. Bona Clara’s Sun Protection protects your skin against UVA and UVB rays. These rays cause sunburn, discoloration, cell damage, dryness and premature again. Our Sun Protection creates an invisible shield at the surface to deflect harmful rays. It also protects at the cellular level in case any rays do sneak through. UVA rays penetrate deeper into the skin and are the kinds of rays that are responsible for skin cancer. UVB rays cause the redness and surface burns. You definitely want to make sure your skin is protected fully. And keep REAPPLYING.”

“SPF numbers don’t “add up”.

If you apply a moisturizer with an SPF 15 and makeup with SPF 20, you are not at a “total” SPF of 35. You are only at whatever your highest SPF product is. For those with sensitive skin, do not mix SPFs. For example, try not to use a moisturizer with SPF 20 and makeup with SPF 25 on top. The mixing of the SPFs can sometimes be irritating to the skin (for those who are more sensitivity prone).”

Skin Cancer Awareness: SPF & Sunscreen Facts 2013 How To Prevent Melanoma And Protect Your Skin Whether You're Caucasian, Latino Or African American

Jasmina Aganovic

L’Oréal Paris and SkinCeuticals have partnered up with the Melanoma Research Alliance (MRA), and are on a quest to help prevent melanoma and raise funds for life-saving research. The two brands have also launched two new sunscreens for this summer season.

THE FACTS:

- Melanoma is the deadliest form of skin cancer
- 1 person dies every hour in the US from melanoma
- More than 76,000 Americans are diagnosed with melanoma each year
-  99% of skin cancer patients survive with early detection

THE RESPONSE:

L’Oréal Paris:

· Giving $1.00 for each bottle sold from their Sublime Sun SPF Collection to the Melanoma Research Alliance (MRA)

·  Have partnered on a three year grant with MRA for further research to find a cure

SkinCeuticals:

· Releasing a PSA-style video that takes a lighthearted approach to a very serious issue. Influencers include Top Chef host, Padma Lakshmi, fashion designer Rebecca Minkoff, NHL star, Sean Avery, lifestyle blogger, Derek Blasberg, and New York society influencer, Annabelle Dexter-Jones engage in a call-to-action promoting skincare checks.

Skin Cancer Awareness: SPF & Sunscreen Facts 2013 How To Prevent Melanoma And Protect Your Skin Whether You're Caucasian, Latino Or African American

SkinCeuticals Sport UV Defense SPF 50 ($40.00)

The formula is also non-comedogenic, alcohol-free, paraben-free, oxybenzone-free and is fortified with Artemia Salina, which increases skin’s resistance to UV and heat stress, and protects collagen from UV damage.

· Charity component: SkinCeuticals will be sponsoring free skincare checks at locations across the country. Find participating doctors at SkinCeuticals.com/prevent. The brand will also donate $1.00 to the MRA for every video view.

In a L’Oréal Paris survey conducted by Kelton (being released on Monday, May 6th – “Melanoma Monday”), findings prove that while the majority of American women are aware of melanoma, over half give themselves a “C” or lower when grading their healthy sun care habits. Hispanic and African American women, among whom the incidence of melanoma is growing, are even less likely to take steps to protect their skin. Key findings from the survey include:

· Women lack information about melanoma and want to know more 

- 95% percent of American women who have heard of melanoma know that it first affects the skin, but for many, the knowledge stops there

· Of those women who know of melanoma, far fewer know that not reapplying sunscreen every two hours (54%) or having freckles or moles (54%) could put someone at a higher risk for the disease   

- Less than three in ten (28%) American women believe it’s possible they could develop melanoma in their lifetimes; this belief is even lower among African-American (7%) and Hispanic (16%) women

- While fewer than three in ten (28%) American women who are aware of the disease believe they have a chance of developing it, almost one in four (23%) stress that they would like to know more about it

Skin Cancer Awareness: SPF & Sunscreen Facts 2013 How To Prevent Melanoma And Protect Your Skin Whether You're Caucasian, Latino Or African American

L’Oréal Paris Sublime Sun Sheer Protect Sunscreen Oil SPF 15-50+ ($9.99 – $10.99)

This spray contains a nourishing blend of argan oil, shea oil, grapeseed oil and sunflower oil. The easily-absorbed formulas include a light beach-inspired scent and utilize L’Oréal Paris’ patent-pending polymer technology for improved water resistance.

· Women know they should wear sunscreen, but don’t… 

Lack of sunscreen use is likely why many American women give themselves failing sun care grades. A third (33%) of those who think they would earn a C or worse admit they rarely, if ever, wear sunscreen, versus 7% of those who would grade themselves better

- 21% of US women, 17% of Hispanic women and 37% of African American women never or rarely wear sunscreen

- Almost half (46% of US women, 46% of Hispanic women and 36% of African-American women polled) only wear sunscreen when they know they’ll be in the sun for a long time

- Less than one in ten (9%) American women wear sunscreen daily and reapply it every few hours

· An alarming percentage of American women don’t take steps to check their skin for melanoma

- A minority (30% of American women, 15% of Hispanics and 19% African Americans) regularly give themselves skin exams

- 86% of US women would NOT recognize a melanoma on themselves

- Only 11% of American women regularly see a dermatologist

- 88% of US women, 89% of Hispanic women and a shocking 96% of African American women have not had any kind of dialogue with a doctor about melanoma

How are you lovely ladies protecting your skin this summer? Let us know by commenting below (you just might win a free sample)! Make sure to follow us on our Pinterest page by clicking HERE! And don’t forget to get the latest beauty and skincare news by following us on Twitter @BeautyStat!

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BeautyStat frequently receives products for review but its opinions and reviews are completely unbiased and not sponsored. Should there ever be a sponsored post, we will ensure that this is displayed clearly in the post heading. Samples are certainly welcome for consideration but do not guarantee reviews.



9 thoughts on “Skin Cancer Awareness: SPF & Sunscreen Facts 2013: How To Prevent Melanoma And Protect Your Skin Whether You’re Caucasian, Latino Or African American

  1. Bonnie Marshall

    I would “LOVE!” to win this! I’ve never won anything this nice before! Good Luck to My Self!

  2. Cathy D Boone

    I’ve been wearing sunscreen since my late 30′s (I’m 50 now). I’m a pool rat and beach bunny. Ever since I read an article on the dangers of the sun and the rise of skin cancer among African American women, I’ve been slathering on the sunscreen ever since. I ditch the perfume in the summer and opt for the scent of sunscreen instead. I absolutely love it.

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